Monday, October 1st

Blake, from Songs of Innocence (Frontispiece Image), Title page for Songs of Innocence, Introduction”,  “The Ecchoing Green” (2 images), “The Lamb,”  and “Holy Thursday”, 1789, (Plain text in BABL B: 63, 64, 65, and 66)

from Songs of Innocence and Experience, Title Page,  FrontispieceSongs of Experience title page,  “Introduction,” “Holy Thursday”, “The Tyger“, and “London,” pub. with Songs of Innocence, 1794Plain text  in BABL B: 67,  68, 69, 70)

There are links to the Blake Archive on the website for all of these poems and the plate engravings associated with them. Please see the website for today’s reading. You will also find plain text in the anthology)

Extra Credit Opportunity: Dr. Chloe Wigston Smith will be speaking on “Small Things in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World” at 4:30pm in Park Hall 265. You are also invited to the reception afterwards.

You may receive up to 1 extra point on your first semester exam by attending this talk. Please pay close and respectful attention during the presentation. After the talk, submit a 2-paragraph response. Your response should go beyond mere summary, making connections to literature you have studied or read, ideally in this class, but everything you’ve read is fair game. 

Link to department websitehttp://english.uga.edu/events/content/2018/small-things-eighteenth-century-atlantic-world-dr-chloe-wigston-smith

 

 

In-Class Writing: How did reading “Holy Thursday” in Songs of Innocence and Experience change your initial impression of “Holy Thursday” in Songs of Innocence? Did reading “The Tyger” change your reading of “The Lamb”?

Wednesday, October 3rd

Poetry Day:  “Reading Poetry” (BABL B 1612-1639) 

“Poetry both represents and creates emotions in a highly condensed way” (1612)

“a poem is a discourse that is characterized by a heightened attention to language, form, and rhythm, by an expressiveness that works through figurative rather than literal modes, and by a capacity to stimulate our imagination and arouse our feelings” (1612)

How to Analyze Poetry  and The Metrical Foot

List of Literary Terms

Poetry Exercises: Please print up 2 copies. Bring 1 copy in that you have completed and 1 copy that is blank. <Poetry Exercise>

**

“Tintern Abbey with Elegant Figures,” c. 1815

Monday, October 8th

Coleridge, “The Eolian Harp,” 1795, “Frost at Midnight,”1798, and excerpt from Biographia Literaria, Chapter 13,  On the Imagination, 1817 (BABL B 279-280; 283-284; 311)

Wordsworth, from the Preface to Lyrical Ballads, “Expostulation and Reply,”  “The Tables Turned,”  and “I wandered lonely as a cloud,” pub. 1807 (BABL B 147-154; 144)

Glossary:  Personal Lyric, Dramatic Lyric, Ballad, Ode, and Blank Verse

Definitions of the Romantic Ballad, Lyric, and Ode

 

Group Work two-part in-class writing task:

  1. Provide one example from “Frost at Midnight” where the speaker of the poem employs the secondary imagination to “idealize” and “unify” insights, objects, or memories. Cite by line number.
  2. Cite one passage in which Wordsworth defines either poetry or the poet in his Preface to Lyrical Ballads, the 1798 volume of poetry that he published with Coleridge. 

Wednesday, October 10th

Continue discussion of Coleridge, “Frost at Midnight” and Wordsworth, “Expostulation and Reply,”  “The Tables Turned,”  and “I wandered lonely as a cloud.”

Begin discussion of Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, 1817, and contextual material, (BABL B: 284-294)

Gustav Dore, Illustrations of “Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” 1876

**

Monday, October 15th

Conclude discussion of Coleridge

OPTIONAL READING: Wordsworth’s “Lines Written a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey” (BABL B 145-147)

Coleridge Quotes and Structure of Romantic Lyric Process

Writing Workshop: Please bring in your first essay.

Prior to Class:

Print up, Read, and Annotate for Credit: Writing Guidelines

Read the Essay Writing Powerpoint.

In a separate document (that you will print up and bring to class)

*List the elements that belong in the title of a literary analysis essay

*List the elements that belong in the first paragraph of a literary analysis essay

*Identify two writing techniques, directives, or other information that you believe will be helpful while writing your next paper. How will these new techniques, etc. make your paper stronger?

Wednesday, October 17th

Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (Volume I ). Read the Front Matter (title page, dedication and the 1818 Preface)

Powerpoint Lecture on Frankenstein’s beginnings (to be updated)

Glossary: first-person narrator and nested narration

Extra Credit Opportunity:

“Mary Shelley, ‘Frankenstein,’ and Cinematic Adaptations: A Cinema Roundtable”at 4:00pm in 400 Fine Arts, The Balcony Theater. This roundtable gathers together panelists from literature and film, including Roxanne Eberle, Nancee Reeves, and Holly Gallagher from the English Department, along with Christopher Sieving from theatre and film studies, and special guest Eddy von Mueller, co-editor of Frankenstein: How A Monster Became an Icon (2018) 

You may receive up to 2 extra points on your second semester exam by attending this panel. Please pay close and respectful attention during the presentation. After the event, submit a 2-paragraph response. Your response should go beyond mere summary, making connections to literature you have studied or read, ideally in this class, but everything you’ve read is fair game. 

Link to department website:

http://www.english.uga.edu/events/content/2018/mary-shelley-frankenstein-and-cinematic-adaptations-cinema-roundtable

**

Frontispiece to 1831 Frankenstein

Monday, October 22nd

Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (Volume II and III)

Wednesday, October 24th

Conclude discussion of Frankenstein. We’ll begin with small group discussion of selected critical articles and then move into a full class discussion.

Readings:

Anne K. Mellor, “Possessing Nature: The Female in Frankenstein.” 1988 (Norton 355-368)

Jonathan Bate, excerpt from “The State of Nature” in The Song of Earth, 2000 (Norton 476-480)

John Bugg, “‘Master of their language’: Education and Exile in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein“, 2016, https://sites.broadviewpress.com/frankenstein/articles-on-frankenstein/john-bugg-master-of-their-language-education-and-exile-in-mary-shelleys-frankenstein/.pdf. Originally published in the Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 68, No 4., December 2005.

How to read literary criticism:

  1. Identify the author’s argument and summarize for yourself.
  2. Look for the evidence that the author uses to support that argument.
  3. Consider the ways in which the author’s argument aligns with the way that you read the text under consideration. Can you find another piece of evidence to support the author’s argument? How would you respond to this author? In what ways would you expand upon their argument and what evidence would you use?
  4. Do you disagree with the author? What evidence can you find that supports the grounds of your disagreement?

**

Monday, October 29th

Second Exam (Description)

Second Essay Assigned (Description): Essay Due Saturday, November 10th at 9:00 pm

Boris Karloff as Frankenstein’s Creature, 1931

Wednesday, October 31st

Participation in the Frankenread: Our class will meet in the Main Library’s Einstein’s Cafe to listen to fellow classmates participate in the reading. Readers will earn 1 extra point that will go towards your second exam grade.

Link to the NEH Frankenread Website

Link to UGA Description of the Frankenvent

Extra Credit Opportunity: The final 30 minutes of Frankenread will take place at Ciné, just prior to a free screening of The Bride of Frankenstein (1935), which will be accompanied by a small reception. This event begins at 7:00 pm.

You may receive up to 2 extra points on your second semester exam by attending this film.. After the event, submit a 2-paragraph response to the movie. Your response should go beyond mere summary, making connections to literature you have studied or read, ideally in this class, but everything you’ve read is fair game. 

Link to department website:

http://www.english.uga.edu/events/content/2018/ugas-frankenread-halloween-event

 

**

Link to August’s Schedule

Link to September’s Schedule

Link to the November and December Schedule

Link to Course Homepage

image_pdf