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Friday, February 2nd

Sense and Sensibility (Volume II)

Group Work: Who is the “heroine” of this novel? Is there more than one? Or not one at all? Support your assertion by moving beyond plot to also talk about narrative voice and structure.

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Monday, February 5th

Sense and Sensibility (Volume III)

Claudia Johnson, “Sense and Sensibility: Opinions Too Common and Too Dangerous” (Norton)

Mary Favret, “Sense and Sensibility: The Letter, post Factum” (Norton)

In Class Writing: Say/Ask Exercise

  1. SAY [Statement, thought, epiphany, comment, critique, posit]
  2. ASK [Question, query, confusion]

Write one to three sentences for each of the above directions for both pieces of criticism that you read for today. Include page numbers of the passages that triggered your thought or question.

Wednesday, February 7th

View Sense and Sensibility film clips

Deborah Kaplan, “Mass Marketing Jane Austen: Men, Women, and Courtship in Two Film Adaptations” (Norton)

Sense and Sensibility. Directed by Ang Lee,  screenplay by Emma Thompson, performances by Emma Thompson, Kate Winslet, Hugh Grant, Greg Wise, and Alan Rickman, Columbia Pictures, 1995. (Available on Amazon Prime and Starz). (2 hours and 20 minutes)

Hair cutting scene /Chapter 13, 51:19-52:39; ballroom scene and following / Chapter 18, 1:20-1:27; scenes of Marianne’s illness

Sense and Sensibility. Directed by John Alexander, screenplay by Andrew Davies, performances by Hattie Morahan, Charity Wakefield, Janet McTeer, and Dan Stevens, British Broadcasting Company, 2008. (Available on Hulu and  Amazon Prime) (2 hours and 54 minutes)

Love scene at Allenham / Episode 2 / “Previously on”; 11:16-13:05; 16:15-19:48; 22:27-22:47; Edward chopping wood 30:30-35:54

Friday, February 9th

Continue viewing Sense and Sensibility film clips: (1995) last 15 minutes; (2008); scene of duel intercut with Marianne writing / first 3:16 minutes; scene of Elinor drinking the wine / Episode 3 / 7:04-7:54 (scene of Colonel Brandon talking to Eliza followed by scene of M. playing 14:05); scene of Marianne’s illness with Elinor over her 38:05-39:51; concluding scenes 46:18-50:00; 51:32—58:18

Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, “Jane Austen and the Masturbating Girl” (Norton)

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Monday, February 12th

Pride and Prejudice (Volume I)

 It is a truth universally acknowledged, that the first sentence of Pride and Prejudice is the most famous of Jane Austen’s many sentences.

Whose voice is it though? In other words, who focalizes this insight and to what end?  Is it the narrator or a character in the novel? Is it meant to be serious, satiric, or silly? Please support your assertions with specific evidence from the text.

Wednesday, February 14th

Continue discussion of Pride and Prejudice 

Pride and Prejudice and Valentine’s Day

Pride and Prejudice. Directed by Simon Langton,  dramatized byAndrew Davies, performances by Colin Firth and Jennifer Ehle, BBC Television and BBC Worldwide Americas, Inc., 1995. (Available on Amazon Prime and Hulu). (5 hours and 23 minutes)

Pride and Prejudice. Directed by Joe Wright, screenplay by Deborah Moggach, performances by Keira Knightley and Matthew Macfayden, Focus Features, 2005. (Available for purchase on Amazon Prime) (2 hours and 9 minutes)

NEW DUE DATE: Juvenilia, Northanger Abbey and Sense and Sensibility Essays Due

Friday, February 16th

Pride and Prejudice (Volume II)

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Monday, February 19th

Pride and Prejudice (Volume III)

Alistair Duckworth, from The Improvement of the Estate.1971. Pride and Prejudice : An Authoritative Text, Backgrounds and Sources, Criticism, edited by Donald Gray, W.W. Norton, 3rd ed., 2001, pp. 306-331.

Susan Fraiman, “The Humiliation of Elizabeth Bennet” .1993. Pride and Prejudice : An Authoritative Text, Backgrounds and Sources, Criticism, edited by Donald Gray, W.W. Norton, 3rd ed., 2001, pp. 356-365.

Sandra Macpherson, “Rent to Own: or, What’s Entailed in Pride and Prejudice.” 2003. Pride and Prejudice : An Authoritative Text, Backgrounds and Sources, Criticism, edited by Donald Gray and Mary Favret, W.W. Norton, 4th ed., 2016, pp. 381-390.

Wednesday, February 21st / Class Cancelled

Friday, February 23rd

View clips from Pride and Prejudice adaptations

Brian McFarlane, “Something Old, Something New: ‘Pride and Prejudice’ On Screen,” Screen Education 40 (2005): 6-14. [You’ll have to login to Galileo first if you’re accessing this off-campus. In either case, you’ll have to click your way through: “Find it @ UGA” (on the far left hand side of the screen); then click on “ProQuest Central,”  and then “Download PDF” or “Full text – PDF” to access the article. There are a lot of colorful photos in this article so make sure you get to that display.]

Deborah Cartmell, “Pride and Prejudice and the adaptation genre.” Journal of Adaptation in Film and Performance, vol. 3, no. 3, 2010, pp. 227-243.

Laura Carroll and John Wiltshire, “Film and Television” from The Cambridge Companion to Pride and Prejudice , edited by Janet Todd, Cambridge University Press, 2013, pp. 162-173.

Trailer for the 1940 Pride and Prejudice

Trailer for Becoming Jane

**
Monday, February 26th

Clips from Pride and Prejudice adaptations

 Fiction into Film Guide

Claudia Johnson, “Pride and Prejudice and the Pursuit of Happiness”. 1988. Pride and Prejudice : An Authoritative Text, Backgrounds and Sources, Criticism, edited by Donald Gray, W.W. Norton, 3rd ed., 2001, pp. 345-355.

Darcy on Film [Link to two articles below]

Sue Birtwhistle and Susie Conklin, [“A Conversation with Colin  Firth”]. 1995. Pride and Prejudice : An Authoritative Text, Backgrounds and Sources, Criticism, edited by Donald Gray, W.W. Norton, 3rd ed., 2001, pp. 384-388.

Cheryl L. Nixon, [“Darcy in Action”]. 1998. Pride and Prejudice : An Authoritative Text, Backgrounds and Sources, Criticism, edited by Donald Gray, W.W. Norton, 3rd ed., 2001, pp. 389-391.

Susan Fraiman, “The Liberation of Elizabeth Bennet in Joe Wright’s Pride and Prejudice.”Persuasions, vol. 31, issue 1, 2010, pp. 1-5.

Wednesday, February 28th

Fan Fiction Reading

newredshoes. “Sif and Sensibility.” Archive of Our Own. Organization for Transformative Works. 29 Aug 2011. Web. 28 Mar 2014. <http://archiveofourown.org/works/246793> Can be downloaded as a PDF and printed; please add page numbers.

mardia. “a previous engagement.” Archive of Our Own. Organization for Transformative Works. 31 May 2016. Web. 8 February 2018  <http://archiveofourown.org/works/7034767> Can be downloaded as a PDF and printed; please add page numbers.

biichan. “Five Sons Mr and Mrs Bennet Never Had.” Archive of Our Own. Organization for Transformative Works. 22 July 2010. Web. 8 February 2018  <http://archiveofourown.org/works/102470/chapters/140793> Can be downloaded as a PDF and printed; please add page numbers.

madamefaust. “Sonnet Number One Hundred and Forty Five.” Fanfiction. 12 August 2005. 8 February 2018. <https://www.fanfiction.net/s/2530630/1/Sonnet-Number-One-Hundred-and-Forty-Five> You have to read this story online.

Critical Reading

Lev Grossman,  “How Harry Potter Became the Boy Who Lived Forever.” TIME. 7 July 2011. < http://content.time.com/time/arts/article/0,8599,2081784,00.html>

Veerle Van Steenhuyse,  “”Jane Austen fan fiction and the situated fantext.” From English Text Construction 4.2 (2011): 1-11. (The article is quite long; you only need to read the first 11 pages).

Fan Fiction Vocabulary

From Grossman:  fan fiction (1/8); fandom (2/8); slash (3/8); canon (4/8); Alternate Universe (AU) (5/8); crossover stories (5/8); RPF (real-person fiction) (5/8); transformative fiction (6/8)

From Van Steenhuyse: another definition of fan fiction canon (1); fan fiction “negative capability” (4-5); fantext vs. fanon (6); Janeitism (11)

Schedule for March

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